Tag: Mental health struggles

Decision Making Based On Wellbeing Can Be Tough – But Remember You’re Important

selective focus photography of woman holding yellow petaled flowers

If you are reading this or any other article on this website, it is safe to assume that for whatever reason, you have an interest in mental health.  I am willing to go out on a limb and say that that interest stems from personal experience whether that be first or second hand.  I’m also going to bet that whatever experience you may have had, involved some difficult decision making.

The Avoidance Of Mental Health

woman in gray turtleneck long sleeve shirt

If you are unlucky enough to experience life with the same sense of failure as I have every day, then just know that you are not alone.  I think this is a quite common trait for those who suffer from mental ill health.  We know, as rational, intelligent human beings what we need to do to help ourselves in the long run, we also know that those things are not huge, disruptive changes.  We also know, deep down, that our self-sabotage stems from our brain’s need/desire to gain hits of serotonin and dopamine throughout the day to make it through.  So, even though we want to be productive, the video games or Netflix binge are more appealing.  Even though we want to eat the foods that can help our overall health, the chocolate bar, or the crisps we don’t need are too tempting not to eat.  The vicious cycle perpetuates our struggles and prevents us from completing simple tasks to make bigger steps. 

How Do You Recognise Me?

shallow focus of person holding mirror

When someone outside of our brains, outside of the people who have close personal relationships with us recognises us with ease, it bursts the complacent BDD bubble.  It is a jarring back to reality that our bodies and faces don’t morph and change regularly, that we do look a certain way all the time.  And there is a twinge of fear at the back of our minds because we don’t know what that certain look is.  We don’t know what we look like, but this person does, and we will never know what they see, what strangers see.  It is extremely depersonalising to be unable to comprehend how we are perceived by others.  How do you recognise me when I can’t recognise myself?  And how is it fair that you know my face better than I do?

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