Try To Embrace Your Soft Side

It’s not only okay to be a soft person, but I would also argue that it is something to be proud of. Embrace the parts of you that are not yet hardened by the world, own the side of you that is emotional and sensitive. Think of all the wonderful things we could do if there were more people focused on being kind and empathetic in the world.

How Do You Recognise Me?

When someone outside of our brains, outside of the people who have close personal relationships with us recognises us with ease, it bursts the complacent BDD bubble.  It is a jarring back to reality that our bodies and faces don’t morph and change regularly, that we do look a certain way all the time.  And there is a twinge of fear at the back of our minds because we don’t know what that certain look is.  We don’t know what we look like, but this person does, and we will never know what they see, what strangers see.  It is extremely depersonalising to be unable to comprehend how we are perceived by others.  How do you recognise me when I can’t recognise myself?  And how is it fair that you know my face better than I do?

The National Shame Of Love Island

nstoppable train that is Love Island worries me most because, to me, it means one of two things.  Either the progress we have apparently made as a society in reducing the stigma around mental health and improving attitudes is all fake and is nothing more than a trend for people to get more likes and clout on the internet and no one really wants to fight for genuine change.  Or protecting people’s mental health, preserving someone’s life, is simply not as important to people as some low-rate evening entertainment.