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New Year’s Resolutions: A Good Thing?

New Year, new me! How many times have you been asked what your new year’s resolutions are? There is no escaping the notion at this time of year.

Should we bother with new year’s resolutions?

You have to admit that there is something about a new year that truly feels like a new beginning. We are filled with hope and optimism. It really can be a great jumping-off point for those goals and dreams that we have been putting off. But are these resolutions always a good thing?

First of all, let’s not ignore the fact that we have all probably made more resolutions than achievable. We all know that most of the time resolutions are quickly forgotten. Life gets in the way, old routines continue, and often we simply don’t commit.  There is no harm in not achieving any goals you set at the start of the year. But for many who struggle with their mental health, it can feel like a devastating failure.

I think that is the main downside to new year’s resolutions, is the potential personal failure one might feel.  It is easy to argue that resolutions are supposed to be fun and nothing to get yourself worked up over. However, when you struggle with anxiety, depression, or anything that affected your self-esteem, the last thing you need is another perceived failure to make you feel worse.

Overall, I think that resolutions are a great, fun, way of setting goals for yourself. Ultimately though, they are just fun, they are not an expectation. They are not something that is compulsory. Set yourself some fun, interesting resolutions. Try to complete them by the end of the year (or at least have made some progress). Then, make sure you keep them fun and not a chore. Life is stressful enough, especially in recent years. The last thing we need is to cause more worry and guilt over things that ultimately are ending up not improving our lives.

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